Names at Barangaroo

Barangaroo has given Sydney’s past a lasting place in its future as the Authority announces 18 new place and road names within the precinct. Among the new names is that of Wulugul Walk, the new foreshore promenade which extends from Walsh Bay to King Street Wharf.

The names that have been gazetted as at 5 June, 2015 include those of three coves, three roads, three laneways, three steps, a foreshore promenade, a pier, a pontoon, a plaza, a lawn and a cultural space.

In creating names for the new places and roads at Barangaroo, the Authority undertook a comprehensive consultation process to ensure names reflected the site’s rich history and importance for Sydney. The Authority consulted with key stakeholders including the City of Sydney, Lend Lease, the NSW Geographical Names Board, the Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council and the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council.

As a result, more than 40 per cent of all names at Barangaroo reference Aboriginal people and culture. At the northern end of the site, there are also historical and natural themes among the names, while towards the southern end of the site nautical and urban themes are used.

Four place names were selected through a public vote run online and promoted through the Daily Telegraph.

The new names are:

    1. Nawi Cove
    For the largest cove and is situated between Barangaroo Reserve and Central Barangaroo. Nawi is a Sydney Aboriginal word for the bark canoes used by local Aboriginal people in the late 18th Century; it is believed that Barangaroo, the woman after whom the site is named, would have used a nawi.

    2. Watermans Cove
    For the cove adjacent to the intersection of Barangaroo Avenue and Watermans Quay. In the 19th Century, watermen were integral to public and private transport on the harbour and their craft were used to transport passengers to ships at anchor.

    3. Marrinawi Cove
    For the small cove adjacent to Moores Wharf. Marrinawi was an Aboriginal Sydney language word created to describe the vessels of the First Fleet and meant “big canoe”.

    4. Barton Street

    For an east-west road that borders Central Barangaroo and Barangaroo South.   It is named for Edmund Barton, Australia’s first prime minister. Barton was born in Glebe, was a student of Fort Street High School and was the Member for East Sydney, yet until now he has not been commemorated in the CBD.

    5. Watermans Quay

    For an east-west road leading to Watermans Cove. In the 19th Century, watermen were integral to public and private transport on the harbour and their craft were used to transport passengers to ships at anchor.

    6. Barangaroo Avenue

    For the main north-south road at Barangaroo.

    7. Scotch Row

    For a pedestrian laneway at Barangaroo South. This celebrates the area known as Scotch Row, which ran along Clyde Street (since removed as part of the construction of Hickson Road). Scotch Row housed master stonemasons who were brought to help build Sydney and whose local work includes the Hero of Waterloo hotel, the Lord Nelson hotel and Unwin's Stores.

    8. Mercantile Walk

    For a pedestrian laneway at Barangaroo South. Barangaroo has been a hub and hive of commerce for 200 years. 

    9. Shipwright Walk

    For a pedestrian laneway at Barangaroo South. This acknowledges the maritime and shipbuilding history of the area.

    10. Girra Girra Steps

    For a set of steps within Barangaroo Reserve. The Aboriginal Sydney word girra girra for seagulls was recorded by early settlers and referred to “fishing gulls”. 

    11. Burrawang Steps

    For a set of steps within Barangaroo Reserve. Burrawang is the Aboriginal Sydney language word for a local cycad, the seeds of which were an important source of starch for the Gadigal people and early settlers. They are very long-lived plants, typically surviving for more than a century, and symbolise the park's future longevity.

    12. Baludarri Steps

    For a set of steps within Barangaroo Reserve. Baludarri is the Aboriginal Sydney language word for leatherjacket, a fish commonly found in Sydney Harbour.

    13. Wulugul Walk

    For the foreshore walk along Barangaroo. Wulugul is the Aboriginal Sydney language word for kingfish, commonly found in Sydney Harbour. Kingfish have a golden band along their blue-green skin, similar to the foreshore walk’s golden sandstone lining the blue of the harbour.

    14. Dukes Pier

    For the pier located within Nawi Cove. The name recognises a wharf on the original headland of Millers Point. It acknowledges the nearby streets named for the English Dukes of Sussex, Kent, Clarence and York - the sons of King George III.

    15. Rowntrees Dock

    For a dock situated within Nawi Cove. Rowntrees recognises Rowntrees Floating Dock, a large 19th Century wharf located almost exactly at the pontoon’s location.

    16. Exchange Place

    For the main plaza at Barangaroo South. Historically this has been a place of exchange of goods, ideas and people.

    17. Stargazer Lawn

    For a large grassed area at Barangaroo Reserve. A name with two meanings: stargazers are a fish found in Sydney Harbour, while the name also speaks to the adjacency of the Observatory.

    18. the Cutaway

    For the cultural space within the headland at Barangaroo Reserve.

    19. Walumil Lawns
    For a series of lawns rolling down the bluff at Barangaroo Reserve. Wulumil is the Sydney Aboriginal word for Port Jackson shark.

    The naming gazettal process for Barangaroo Reserve is not yet complete. Names for two bridges, a park, a plaza and a ferry hub will be announced soon.