Barangaroo Ngangamay

As the full moon rises and campfire flickers, the dyinalyung (women) sing, dance and beat their possum skin drums to the heartbeat of Country.

As the full moon rises and campfire flickers, the dyinalyung (women) sing, dance and beat their possum skin drums to the heartbeat of Country.

ngangara Barangaroo ngangamaydamulayun ngangara buranggalyun

Rest peacefully Old Lady,We mark this site and continue the Dreaming

Women gathered at Ceremony

Women gathered at Ceremony

Short excerpt from Barangaroo Ngangamay discoverable at Barangaroo Reserve as part of Barangaroo Ngangamay.

Gathered around the campfire are Aunty Lois Birk and daughter Jessica, Aunty Vivienne Mason, Aunty Lee-Anne Mason, Aunty Lila Stewart, Sharon and Ashweeni Mason, Maddy and Lille Madden, Henrietta Baird, Mariko Smith and baby Arabella.

Marri Yannadah – full moon

The cyclical dance between the moon and sun brings us the rhythm of night and day. The moments of transformation, of dawn and twilight, are to be respected, celebrated and always remembered. This particular rock engraving is deeply symbolic with layered meanings and depicts a relationship between the sun, moon and celestial beings.

Under the guidance of Bidjigal Elders Vic Simms and Steven Russell, and Guringai Elder Laurie Bimson, a small team of younger Aboriginal men contributed to the rock engraving production: Kieran Satour, Clarence Slockee and Timothy Gray.

Uncle Steve Russell working a rock engraving

One of several shorts revealing Elders making the rock engravings discoverable at Barangaroo Reserve as part of Barangaroo Ngangamay.

Photos taken by Bonnie Elliott during the creation of Barangaroo Ngangamay by Amanda Jane Reynolds and Genevieve Grieves.