Djiribi

As the sun rises the dyinalyung (women) fish and gather from the ocean to feed their families and the visitors who will travel for the women’s Ceremony. Country has heard the Old Lady calling and pulses with life and excitement.

As the sun rises the dyinalyung (women) fish and gather from the ocean to feed their families and the visitors who will travel for the women’s Ceremony. Country has heard the Old Lady calling and pulses with life and excitement.

Ashweeni Mason

collecting shells

Short excerpt from Djiribi discoverable at Barangaroo Reserve as part of Barangaroo Ngangamay.

Sharon and Ashweeni Mason of the Djaadjawan Dancers share with us Yuin/Dharawal traditions of caring for Country and sharing with community under the loving guidance of Aunty Vivienne Mason, Aunty Lee-Anne Mason and Aunty Lila Stewart. As they fish, cook and mend the lines, they sing up the songlines of the south.

wurridjal – mullet

The mullet is a significant food source and totem that features on many of the old rock art galleries in the Sydney region. This particular rock art design is symbolic of both women and men’s relationship to the ocean and responsibility for resource management.

Bidjigal man Uncle Steven Russell is a master weaver, talented artist and engraver and generous teacher. As a custodian of saltwater Country from southern Sydney and south coast, he has much to teach and share with all who take the time to listen.

Uncle Steve Russell

engraving with stone
The mullet rock engraving coming to life

The mullet rock engraving coming to life

Photos taken by Bonnie Elliott during the creation of Barangaroo Ngangamay by Genevieve Grieves and Amanda Jane Reynolds.

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